CSPC 2017 Themes

Download a PDF

Because 2017 is Canada’s 150th Anniversary, the CSPC themes are being structured within the following context:

  • How effectively have we used science-based knowledge to meet Canada’s challenges over the past 150 years and also today?
  • How should we use science-based knowledge more effectively over the next 50 years to meet Canada’s challenges?

And here are the five themes of CSPC 2017:

What are Canada’s likely challenges in the next 50 years, and how can scientific knowledge be used to solve them?

  • Evolving our economy from resource based to knowledge driven)
  • Ensuring Canada’s position in the world as a powerful peace keeping, innovative, diverse nation)
  • Ensuring an effective federal system with alignment of the interests and values of regions and sectors)
  • Sustainability of our environment, natural resources, and universal health care system)
  • A science enterprise that is excellent, creative, productive and training talent for future needs and opportunities)

How does Canada get the new scientific knowledge it needs?

  • Changing geography of knowledge production and knowledge consumption)
  • Convergence , interdisciplinary science, the role of social sciences and the arts)
  • Big science: role in knowledge production; role of roadmaps)
  • Citizen science: engaging citizens in knowledge production)

How do we strengthen the environment for the production and integration of new scientific knowledge?

  • Funding mechanisms: new realities, new directions)
  • New STI institutions and mechanisms of community engagement)
  • Technology foresight)
  • The impact agenda: measuring what difference science makes; creating the conditions for impact)
  • Balancing accountability and productivity)
  • The role of cities, provinces and territories)

How can we more effectively bring new and existing scientific knowledge to bear on Canada’s challenges?

  • Knowledge for policy development
    • Science and politics: interdependencies and tensions)
    • The science – policy interface in a federal system: federal, provincial & territorial interactions)
    • Decision making in a complex and contested sphere)
    • Lessons from the coal face: case studies of evidence-based decision making)
  • Knowledge for innovation
    • The innovation ecosystem: system thinking; system analysis)
    • SMEs growth and scale up and designing effective supply chain)
    • Technology intensive multinationals: incentives to build vs attract)
    • Procurement and regulation: catalysts or barriers to innovation?)
  • Knowledge to meet global challenges
    • Accessing STI insights and knowledge from the international community)
    • How science can help in a de-globalization era)
    • The role of science in positioning Canada in the international community)

How do we engage the public in Canada’s science system?

  • Risk communication and social license)
  • Social media and science communication in public engagement)
  • Public perception of science and scientists)
  • Science culture and public engagement in science)
  • Science and social innovation in the age of post everything)
Download a PDF

What are Canada’s likely challenges in the next 50 years and how can scientific knowledge be used to solve them?

How does Canada get the new scientific knowledge it needs?

How do we strengthen the environment for the production and integration of new scientific knowledge?

How can we more effectively bring new and existing scientific knowledge to bear on Canada’s challenges?

How do we engage the public in Canada’s science system?

  1. What are Canada’s likely challenges in the next 50 years, and how can scientific knowledge be used to solve them?
    • Evolving our economy from resource based to knowledge driven)
    • Ensuring Canada’s position in the world as a powerful peace keeping, innovative, diverse nation)
    • Ensuring an effective federal system with alignment of the interests and values of regions and sectors)
    • Sustainability of our environment, natural resources, and universal health care system)
    • A science enterprise that is excellent, creative, productive and training talent for future needs and opportunities)
  2. How does Canada get the new scientific knowledge it needs?
    • Changing geography of knowledge production and knowledge consumption)
    • Convergence , interdisciplinary science, the role of social sciences and the arts)
    • Big science: role in knowledge production; role of roadmaps)
    • Citizen science: engaging citizens in knowledge production)
  3. How do we strengthen the environment for the production and integration of new scientific knowledge?
    • Funding mechanisms: new realities, new directions)
    • New STI institutions and mechanisms of community engagement)
    • Technology foresight)
    • The impact agenda: measuring what difference science makes; creating the conditions for impact)
    • Balancing accountability and productivity)
    • The role of cities, provinces and territories)
  4. How can we more effectively bring new and existing scientific knowledge to bear on Canada’s challenges?
    • Knowledge for policy development
      • Science and politics: interdependencies and tensions)
      • The science – policy interface in a federal system: federal, provincial & territorial interactions)
      • Decision making in a complex and contested sphere)
      • Lessons from the coal face: case studies of evidence-based decision making)
    • Knowledge for innovation
      • The innovation ecosystem: system thinking; system analysis)
      • SMEs growth and scale up and designing effective supply chain)
      • Technology intensive multinationals: incentives to build vs attract)
      • Procurement and regulation: catalysts or barriers to innovation?)
    • Knowledge to meet global challenges
      • Accessing STI insights and knowledge from the international community)
      • How science can help in a de-globalization era)
      • The role of science in positioning Canada in the international community)
  5. How do we engage the public in Canada’s science system?
    • Risk communication and social license)
    • Social media and science communication in public engagement)
    • Public perception of science and scientists)
    • Science culture and public engagement in science)
    • Science and social innovation in the age of post everything)

Streams

CSPC 2017 will feature an exciting array of interactive, solution oriented and future focused panels, including Green Paper Discussions, Case Studies, Lightning/TED-type Talks, Interactive Learning Session, Debate and At Issue Formats.

Head

text